Zombie Sonnet 7: Zombies on Halloween

The Zombie Sonnets: HalloweenBecause nobody ever said you had to write about flowers…

Zombie Sonnet 7: Zombies on Halloween

On Halloween, they dress in human clothes
With all the buttons and the seams intact
They shine their shoes and gather all their toes
And even gel what hair they have straight back
They imitate the human parts of speech
Enunciating groans and talking sports
They like to keep a coffee mug in reach
For coffee keeps the humans in the sorts
And though this sounds like envy on their part
As if the zombies want a run at life
The truth is zombies are just kids at heart
They like to dress the part without the strife
For zombies, Halloween can be a gem
They love to see the humans dressed as them

~
Jody Brown is the author of Upside Down Kingdom, and is a multi-blogger, poet, and traveler. Her current writing projects, including her daily blog endeavor, #Project365, can be found at JodyBrown.com/writing. 

The Zombie Sonnets: Grape Stompin’ Zombies

Because it’s harvest time.
And because nobody ever said you had to write about flowers…

The Zombie Sonnets
Zombie Sonnet 6: Grape Stompin’ Zombies
When Jimbo’s toe fell off into the mash,
They banned us all from drinking from the pail.
For zombie stompers harboring a gash,
The bucket stomping was an epic fail.
When stomping grapes, a good technique is key.
The zombies learned to spread the grapes around,
They then could drag a leg or limping knee,
Across the grapes they dumped upon the ground.
But zombies have been on the earth a while,
They know the vintage history they save,
By gathering to stomp the grapes with style.
(It’s true the zombies always loved a rave.)
Because the undead got into the act,
This age-old wine tradition is intact.

~
Jody Brown is the author of Upside Down Kingdom, and is a multi-blogger, poet, and traveler. Her current writing projects, including her daily blog endeavor, #Project365, can be found at JodyBrown.com/writing. 

Goodbye, Old Friend

Globe poemGoodbye, Old Friend

Some of us own the world
Like a globe you can pick up at the mall—
And we can tuck it under our arm and carry it around
Until we tire of it

And we can be so nonchalant about the world
That we eventually give the globe to a friend to watch for us
while we meander
For a season, or two
Or we can set the globe in an old cedar chest
And forget where we put the key
Or we can put it on an attic shelf
And sell the house
Without a second thought
Such were our thoughts about the world

Young fools we were
Fools who never thought it would happen to us
Not again, at least,
Fools to think we could read the roadsigns
When now we see they’re in a language we don’t know

O Love!
We were drunk with your charm
In the summer of our youth
With all that green, the light dancing in the leaves,
The gentle touch of the breeze,
But these were never for us
We spun in a world for a time
That was always slipping away

And now that it’s gone, that old, dusty round globe,
We’ll never know how the lines have changed,
That the boundaries and divisions are ever shifting
Like the wrinkles in a beloved face
That you long to hold once more

Behind us is a memory that didn’t happen
The trees are now shrouded in mist
and we know their greens were not
as vivid as the final reds that will come

It’s not the same old, dusty world anymore
And acutely, we realize:
It was never ours in the first place
We reel from that and vow
Never to fall again
But we know,
that after a long, harsh winter,
the spring will lure us again
And the tricky globe
hiding in plain sight
will continue its spin

~
Jody Brown is the author of Upside Down Kingdom, and is a multi-blogger, poet, and traveler. Her current writing projects, including her daily blog endeavor, #Project365, can be found at JodyBrown.com/writing

Crackalacka

Crackalacka

 

Crackalacka

You know just why I shed a tear,
Impassioned by the sight
When fireworks light up the sky
All red and blue and white?
And they say Boom Boom Crackalacka Boom Boom
Boom Boom Crackalacka

I never meant to stay that long
Then something in me spoke
That day, the plane, the Pentagon
When sleeping giants woke
And they said Boom Boom Jackalacka Boom Boom
Boom Boom Jackalacka

I buy a ticket for a plane
To meet all that I can
I walk up high and walk down low
So I can learn the plan
My feet go Boom Boom Shackalacka Boom Boom
Boom Boom Shackalacka

Some laugh at me, others with me
I start to like the jest
Together we find trust again
I travel on my quest
Laughter goes Boom Boom Hackalacka Boom Boom
Boom Boom Hackalacka

Now decades after WWII
The questions still remain
The Concentration Camp is near
I hop a Dachau train
The train goes Boom Boom Trackalacka Boom Boom
Boom Boom Trackalacka

Jerusalem, I hold my ground
As gunshots break the night
Below the Kidron Valley looms
I see and smell this fight
And it goes Boom Boom Ackalacka Boom Boom
Boom Boom Ackalacka

Yet something in the soil here
Does get the soul to stir
Like drumbeats in the ground itself
That cause the lines to blur
The drum goes Boom Boom Rackalacka Boom Boom
Boom Boom Rackalacka

I understand now what I sought
How heart and war reside
The passion rages like a storm
When hot and cold collide
The storm goes Boom Boom Crackalacka Boom Boom
Boom Boom Crackalacka

Plane touches down, I’m home at last
I stop then on a dime
The world is calling me again
The trumpet says it’s time
Trumpet goes Boom Boom Brackalacka Boom Boom
Boom Boom Brackalacka

It’s more than seeing everything
Until the die is cast
When I’ve felt all I need to feel
My heart will pound its last
The heart goes Boom Boom Sprackalacka Boom Boom
Boom Boom Sprackalacka

Boom Boom Sprackalacka Boom Boom
Boom Boom Sprackalacka

 

~
Jody Brown is the author of Upside Down Kingdom, and is a multi-blogger, poet, and traveler. Her current writing projects, including her daily blog endeavor, #Project365, can be found at JodyBrown.com/writing

Green

Dark green carpet that I remember
Dad installing on his hands
and knees
with his tools and his best friend
on his hands and knees
measuring corners and lengths
while my best friend taught me to do somersaults
and I loved the word
I spelled it in my head the way I wanted to
using words I already knew, summer then salt
and it took me a while to believe that the word even
existed.  You see, I thought, in the middle of orange pulled-up
carpet and dark green new stuff half laid down,
that I knew every word there was to know

And there was a painting on the living room wall
Pap says Nana loved it that’s all he ever said
while it hung above the green carpet
When the living room turned green
the painting was a gift from Nana
with large pine trees leading back to a small
house in the field in the distance
In the foreground was a giant rock,
marking the path through the trees

But then Nana died and our family moved
and the painting is now in a room
with white walls and plush blue carpeting
and Pap still says how much she loved it

And so, you see,
Now I can’t do that
because now I think the rock is actually
a large piece of wood
and that the walls need to be green
for the painting to be held up

 

As a kid, when I’d sleep over my friend’s house
we’d talk and listen to the radio
all night and in the morning we’d be still
because there was this window that faced
the sun in the morning
and my friend loved to sit and look out
because she said no matter what
that red house was still always across the street
and the green tree was always in the yard
and I don’t believe her because
I used to sit and look at that
painting and wonder what it would
be like to be behind that rock
peeking just barely
from behind to see the
people standing in my green living room
looking at me

 

So, now, in the middle of the night
when the radio DJ
finally sets aside his coffee and puts down his
cigarette long enough to let me know he hasn’t
left the building yet
I think his voice
is rough, like me
It is a rough voice because
he hasn’t heard it for a while
and neither have I
and it is new then, too,
Just like I feel